Que's Empire

Trillest Blogger Ever owned by Mpho Bale pile lover of fashion, style and art, simply b logging for those who share the same interest / @Thekid_Que / @5th_Ave_Sa / www.5thavesa.tumblr.com

galxboy:

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freshwallstreet:

NTOMA IS CLOTH.
It was during the 1920’s that west Africa fully adopted the Dutch wax print as a cultural staple, one that has since it’s entry to the Gold Coast (Ghana) suggested status and a symbol of identification. The Dutch, being partly responsible for nurturing the region’s appetite for the vibrantly coloured wax print, slowly adopted cultural symbols into their prints to purposely entice the West African, and it worked,to the extent that proverbs and catchy names coined by the locals have gone to brand this celebrated fabric. Since childhood, “ntoma” which means cloth, has been synonymous with the wax print so much that I thought that was the only fabric that existed. “Ntoma”, has on gone to become a symbol of our culture without much emphasis on it’s origin, and I think, so long as these fine wax prints bare symbols that resonate with our culture, its manufacturing process is practically blind to us.  We, as West Africans have adopted it as our own and now it’s ours, the end.Today the Dutch have been content with the backseat in regards to the face of wax prints, the print has gone so deep into our culture that we are easily identified with it, to the extent that when the world fell in love with it “again” it was documented as “the African Wax Print”. The wax print was a cheap version of hand batiked prints from India, just when demand lost it’s foot in Europe, West Africa picked it up on it, so much that we single handedly built a wax print empire that operates to date. The cloth has become a symbol of status and identification for most with no boundary in it’s use. “We have slept and woken up print” . With time, new alternatives have flooded the market, but the cultural attachment has turned this foreign import into tradition, one that resonates with every West African, regardless of status.”Ntoma” has become us, the colours know our skin and the symbols know our tongue.
words by Allen Coleman
PART 1.
In photo: ” A young girl sits in front of corn grinding shop whiles her mum sells corn based porridge about a few yards away”  (Accra, Ghana)
photo by Allen Coleman

freshwallstreet:

NTOMA IS CLOTH.

It was during the 1920’s that west Africa fully adopted the Dutch wax print as a cultural staple, one that has since it’s entry to the Gold Coast (Ghana) suggested status and a symbol of identification. The Dutch, being partly responsible for nurturing the region’s appetite for the vibrantly coloured wax print, slowly adopted cultural symbols into their prints to purposely entice the West African, and it worked,to the extent that proverbs and catchy names coined by the locals have gone to brand this celebrated fabric. Since childhood, “ntoma” which means cloth, has been synonymous with the wax print so much that I thought that was the only fabric that existed. “Ntoma”, has on gone to become a symbol of our culture without much emphasis on it’s origin, and I think, so long as these fine wax prints bare symbols that resonate with our culture, its manufacturing process is practically blind to us.  We, as West Africans have adopted it as our own and now it’s ours, the end.Today the Dutch have been content with the backseat in regards to the face of wax prints, the print has gone so deep into our culture that we are easily identified with it, to the extent that when the world fell in love with it “again” it was documented as “the African Wax Print”. The wax print was a cheap version of hand batiked prints from India, just when demand lost it’s foot in Europe, West Africa picked it up on it, so much that we single handedly built a wax print empire that operates to date. The cloth has become a symbol of status and identification for most with no boundary in it’s use. “We have slept and woken up print” . With time, new alternatives have flooded the market, but the cultural attachment has turned this foreign import into tradition, one that resonates with every West African, regardless of status.”Ntoma” has become us, the colours know our skin and the symbols know our tongue.

words by Allen Coleman

PART 1.

In photo: ” A young girl sits in front of corn grinding shop whiles her mum sells corn based porridge about a few yards away”  (Accra, Ghana)

photo by Allen Coleman

dynamicafrica:

Spotlight: Photographer Damion Reid and the “Beauty of the Black Woman” Project.

How do you describe what a black woman is? How do you even begin to define her?

You don’t. You leave that up to her.

As black women, as black people, we are well aware of our complexities - whether inherited or otherwise. What’s more, despite our differences being used to divide and separate us, whether through experience or heritage, history has played out in such a way that we are and will always be connected to each other in ways words cannot even begin to describe. As romantic as this may sound, and though there is so much beauty in who we are, there’s a lot of pain that we are still forced to triumph through. Despite all this, as we combat that which has manifested in our lives through both structural and internal racism, it’s so important that we look for ways to find and recreate ourselves on our terms.

Living in a world where black women have to constantly defend their existence and personally find ways to continuously reaffirm their beauty and self-worth, it’s hard not to love what Damion Reid does.

As a Communications Major, Reid was, to say the least, troubled by the negative images and stories he’d often come across of Black women and Black people in the Diaspora. In the Spring of 2002, armed with his camera and desire to show the multi-faceted reality of Black women, he began approaching women he’d see in public in an attempt to capture the “Beauty of the Black Woman.”

Ridding himself of mainstream notions of what beauty is or is supposed to look like, Reid opted to go for something deeper when approaching women, "I share a spiritual bond with Black Women. They are the only people that can understand what me a Black Male goes through. That is beauty to me. I go with my feelings. If it feels right to approach someone, I will do it."

So far, the responses Reid has received have been incredibly positive and wonderfully surprising, “Sometimes the Women are shocked that I want to photograph them. They were not used to be called beautiful, much less photographed.”

For Reid, this is a “never-ending project.” He does plan on taking things further and is currently working on a project that concerns Black men in the Diaspora. 

All photos courtesy of Damion Reid.

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(via okmalume)

blackfashion:

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funkies:

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quickweaves:

guccimaneuver:

britteryikes:

This is terrifying.

this is so fucking disgusting smh

My god I have never seen something so terrifying in my entire life

this is so disgusting stop stop stop why would you fucking do that i am so fucking angry so fucking angry

what the fuck?

LEGIT GOOSEBUMPS THIS IS WILDDDDDD

Wtf bruh

I’m shaking right now like this is so fucked up

Why I just could never like pale people, they call us animals but they truly are…

the whites are getting progressively worse…fuck them tbh

Slim…it’s gettin’ real bad out here. REAL bad.

this is terrifying to me could you imagine what the kids in the car felt? like this is out of hand

how tf us this even legal?

Lol yoh

(via missonthie)

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